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DeKalb County’s students show mixed results on CRCT scores

7/25/2014, 6 a.m.
DeKalb school students improved year-to-year in four subject areas but showed a decline in math on the 2014 Criterion-Referenced Competency ...

DeKalb school students improved year-to-year in four subject areas but showed a decline in math on the 2014 Criterion-Referenced Competency Tests for grades 3-8.

The district said the gains are equal to students statewide.

The CRCT, which was administered in April, measures proficiency in reading, English language arts, science, social studies, and mathematics.

To move up automatically to the next grade, students in third, fifth and eighth grades must pass the reading portion of the CRCT.

Students in fifth and eighth grade must pass the math portion.

DeKalb School Superintendent Michael Thurmond said they are proud of the students, parents, and educators who contributed to the district’s academic growth and achievement.

“We also recognize that more work is left to be done,” he said.

In 30 content-area CRCTs, DeKalb students increased or maintained efficiency rates in 19 areas as compared with 22 areas statewide.

Based on a year-over-year analysis of performance outcomes in all grades, the number of DeKalb students meeting or exceeding standards increased in four of five content areas.

Thurmond attributed the decline in mathematics to a more demanding test this year. He said the district is addressing this need with a set of strategies that will incorporate teacher training, more critical thinking skills for students, and additional student practice time in the upcoming school year.

“The CRCT indicated a need for more rigorous intervention in improving performance in mathematics, science, and social studies,” he said. “We are responding with actions that will directly address this need.”

The Georgia Department of Education says this is the last CRCT test for the state’s students.

Beginning next year, the state will implement Georgia Milestones, a new test for all students. It will consist of one program across grades three to 12 rather than a series of individual tests.